The Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) comprises of 48 countries which India is not part of, yet. Many countries including Japan, most recently, have been vocal about their support for India to be part of the group.

This group of forty-eight countries is responsible for preventing nuclear proliferation by having a hold over the distribution of materials, among other things, needed to manufacture nuclear weapons.

This group was formed in 1974 when India carried out a nuclear test. From the test that our country carried out, it came to known that there were certain materials that were considered safe which could be turned into aiding the development of weapons readily. The NSG had seven countries to begin with: Canada, France, Japan, the UK, the US, West Germany, and the USSR.

Time and again, China has been opposing India’s entry into the NSG but Japan is supporting us. Japan understands that India, when part of the NSG, will help in strengthening the non-proliferation of nuclear materials.

Japan wants India to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and has mentioned that it will keep asking New Delhi to be part of NPT but won’t get this condition in the way of being part of the NSG.

Obviously, it is known to the world that China and Pakistan are allies and reports suggest that China has helped Pakistan acquire technology to develop nuclear weapons by violating NPT and NSG rules. China is willing to let India into the NSG only if Pakistan simultaneously joins the group. But Pakistan’s entry is heavily opposed by many countries because of its track record in dealing with nuclear weapons.

Countries that oppose India’s inclusion in the NSG include Ireland, New Zealand, Turkey, and Austria.

Issues like these need to be handled tactfully and the country has no doubt over Modi’s convincing skills. As time passes, we will come to know the outcome.

But, there is no doubt that India needs to be part of NSG as, over time, it is for the betterment of the world that no country should have the kind of technology and power to use nuclear weapons for war.