Obama
U.S. President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrive for a joint news conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, April 28, 2015.
This year would go down in the history probably as the dawn of a new world order, where peace is the topmost priority. The visit by the incumbent American President Barack Obama to the Japanese city of Hiroshima marks the beginning of a more peaceful era. Being the first serving American President to visit the place certainly embarks a new phase in the 21st century.
Hiroshima was one of the two cities hit by the first ever nuclear bombs that were launched by America during World War 2, other being Nagasaki. The outcome was so horrendous that more than 1 lakh causalities took place. The aftermath was equally terrifying as people are suffering till today. atom bomb
While the visit has been appreciated worldwide, it has raised a question of it being an apology to the Japanese for the atrocities or not?  There are two viewpoints to the above question. While the Japanese who have suffered the atrocities themselves, called hibakusha, are disappointed as they were expecting an apology which can’t change their  suffering but give them a sense of relief. Others are considering this visit as a sign of remorse by the US for their act that took place 71 years ago, though the officials have declined any such intentions.
In my view, we should really ask the question as to would this visit lead to any changes in the present scenario of the nuclear usage? Today the number of nuclear-powered countries have grown as compared to 50-60 years ago. Few of the nations who have powers are terror-stricken, thus, there is a great danger of the resources being used by these modern perpetrators of crime. As a result if any such act takes place ever again, the result would be catastrophic. Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park
Thus, there is a need to make peace with whatever happened in the past and look for a new world which promotes social security and harmony. Hiroshima is sure a reminder of the horror of nuclear war that still has scars which can’t be forgotten but can it be a harbinger of a peaceful future? It’s time to stop blaming one another as to who committed a more atrocious deed and who should feel sorry but to think past that and sow seeds of a nuclear-free world so that this question never arises in the future.