Source: Deccan Chronicle

The media and nation seem to be over Mohammad Akhlaq, a Muslim man from UP, was lynched for allegedly consuming beef, but atrocities in the name of religion, caste and creed are not over in India, the land where religion and caste still dominates and superstitions rule us all.

Recently, the central government has reached out to the Apex Court, asking to put a ban on the practice of Dalits rolling over the food leftover by Brahmins. Allegedly, doing so cures diseases and cures their problems.

In Karnataka, during the festival at Kukke Subrahmanya is celebrated in South Canara district of Karnataka, between November and December, this ritual is practiced.

Also, in Tamil Nadu, this ritual is carried out in April, every year, during the celebration of Aradhna.

This act of the BJP led government, which has a reputation of being Hindu orthodox, is seen as a feeble attempt to flatter Dalit community in the Assembly elections of Goa, UP, and Punjab.

The ones who defend this practice, claim that this practice is voluntary, and the Dalits are not forced to do it. But the Centre, however, strongly states that this practice is inhuman and against human dignity.

According to a report in Hindustan Times, Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment said that this practice is inhuman, superstitious and unhygienic to those who practice it.

The Centre filed an affidavit, which states that such practices cannot be shielded by Article 25 and are, in no way, covered by the Fundamental Right of freedom of religion.

Amidst all this, let us stop and ask, at what point does human poise start to seem important to the society that sees everything through Brahmanical lenses, and how far can we stretch our freedom of religion?